Law of Contradiction

Law of contradiction – what does it mean?

A thing “is” or “is not” – if someone says: “A is” and another person says: “A is not” we would call these assertions contradictory; if the first assertion is true then the second assertion cannot be true; if the second assertion is true then the first assertion is false; both cannot be true at the same time but both can be false. That’s the law of contradiction.

Christians need to understand that if Christianity is true, then Islam must be false; likewise, if Islam is true, then Christianity must be false. We can’t have our cake and eat it, too, can we?

Let’s consider the foundation of Christian dogma: the belief that Jesus is God. One of Islam’s doctrinal teachings, as laid down in the Quran, is that Jesus was only a human being and died a human being.

So here we have a huge, irreconcilable difference in dogma between Christianity and Islam.

People with faith tend to be blind to logic or rational or critical thinking. I was discussing the stupidity of the Genesis account of Adam and Eve with a Catholic [a student of philosophy] in an internet forum and some of the pointers he advanced were so bewildering that I could not believe what I was reading. According to Genesis, Eve gave birth to three sons, first Cain and Abel, and then Seth. The story up to that point projects an impression of creation devoid of other human creatures. Cain, sometime after the killing of Abel, went to live in the land of Nod, married and produced a son called Enoch, vide Genesis 4.17-18:

  • 4.17. Cain lay with his wife, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Enoch. Cain was then building a city, and he named it after his son Enoch.
  • 4.18. To Enoch was born Irad, and Irad was the father of Mehujael, and Mehujael was the father of Methushael, and Methushael was the father of Lamech.

Who was this female person Cain married, since according to script Adam and Eve had given birth to sons only?

According to Genesis 4.26: Seth also had a son, and he named him Enosh. Who was Enosh’s mother? Could it have been Eve? If not, who?

Genesis is full of ridiculous, unbelievable narratives – but let’s limit our critique to the part concerning Adam and Eve.

When I asked the student to clarify as to Cain’s female partner and Enosh’s mother; his response was that the story is myth. And when I countered that if the Adam and Eve story is myth, then God is also myth, he insisted that God [as portrayed in Genesis and the rest of the Old Testament] is not myth. In fact, prior to his statement on Adam and Eve being myth, he had already initiated an incredible output by declaring: “On Eden: Fruit is considered a metaphor. That is to say, the Knowledge of Good and Evil is not part of the fruit’s biochemical composition. (And incidentally, it is “fruit”, not “apple”.) The Tree of Eternal Life, on the other hand, may have had a genuine chemical that prolongs life.” Unmistakably unbelievable!

It was clear he wanted to have his cake and eat it. But that kind of talk has been typical of my experience talking with God-believers. He made a good observation, though, about “fruit” and not “apple” as the term being referred to in the script. If there is a Bible version that refers to the fruit consumed by Adam and Eve as an apple I would like to know which version. But does it make a difference to the story, whether it was an apple or another fruit? Did he analyze the biochemical composition of the fruit in question? Was there a “tree of knowledge of good and evil”? What about the claim of the story being myth? And saying: “may have had a genuine chemical that prolongs life” can be seen as self-contradicting or irrational. Should he admit, post graduation, that it is not unreasonable to say that “if the Bible is truly the word of God, then God is indisputably a bloodthirsty, cruel, despotic, hypocritical, manipulative, revengeful, genocidal maniac,” then I would happily applaud and congratulate him for his educational achievements.

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